Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

AOL Real Estate - Blog

older | 1 | .... | 23 | 24 | (Page 25) | 26 | 27 | 28 | newer

    0 0

    Filed under: ,

    Landlord Threatens to Evict Dying Vet Over Frequent Visitors


    As a former Marine and Iraq War veteran enters the last stages of his fight with terminal cancer, his landlord is threatening to kick him out of his apartment. Robert Lorentz is bound to his studio apartment in Phoenix, diagnosed with bone cancer and reportedly having only months to live. He has friends frequently coming by to care for him, but neighbors in the apartment building where Lorentz lives complain that those visitors are disruptive. His landlord is giving him 30 days to remedy that or face eviction, Phoenix TV station KPNX reported.

    Bed-bound veteran Robert Lorentz hold medalsLorentz used to be homeless, and the visitors stopping by are his "street family," he told KPNX. But several complaints have been made that his visitors fight and cause all kinds of noise as they come in and out of Lorentz's apartment at all hours. Police have reportedly been called to the complex several times as a result.

    Landlord Emanuel Dobos told KPNX that he is sympathetic to Lorentz's situation, but the disruptions can't continue. "I've tried to reason with them," he said. "I have tried not to evict him. But something needs to be done."

    Lorentz's friends insist that they aren't being disruptive. They said that they shop for groceries for him, bathe him and cook for him. Dobos said that he is concerned that they actually are squatters mooching off of Lorentz for a place to say. Lorentz pays $590 a month for the apartment, which he got through a homeless advocacy group, Hom Inc.

    See the whole story at KPNX.

    See other news about eviction battles:
    World War II Vet John Potter, 91, Faces Eviction by Daughter
    Woman, 62, Adopted by Man, 85, Fights Eviction From His Apartment
    Intricate Underground City for Homeless Uncovered In Kansas City, Mo.

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to
    calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.
    Find homes for rent in your area.

    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.


     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0
  • 06/13/13--00:38: Top 10 U.S. Rental Markets
  • Filed under:



    This time of year, scoring a rental can be a battle. Spring and summer are traditionally the hottest times of the year for rentals, and apartments can fly off the market in no time. Of course, as in all things real estate, location determines how hot the rental market is. Realtor.com looked at the 10 hottest rental markets in America based on its rental search data. Click through the gallery below to see them. (Text on all slides courtesy of Realtor.com).

    %Gallery-190692%
    See more news on rentals:
    5 Things Vacation Rental Guests Really Want
    Where Micro-Apartments Loom as Next Big Thing in Renting
    Underwater Borrowers Becoming Accidental Landlords

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to
    calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.
    Find homes for rent in your area.

    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under: ,




    If you're planning a road trip and want a mobile home that screams style, consider getting yourself an eleMMent Palazzo -- that is, if you're able to part with $3 million for it.

    The world's most expensive mobile home, as described in the GeoBeats video above, has a beautiful state-of-the-art interior. It's equipped with a large master bedroom, a driver's seat that resembles an airplane cockpit and even a rooftop terrace that's presumably equipped to accommodate all your s'more-making needs. If anything is bound to silence the chorus of are-we-there-yets, this has got to be it. To see more of the moving mansion's amenities, check out the video above.

    See more on mobile homes:
    RV Living: How to Make it Without a House
    Tricycle House in China Gives New Meaning to Mobile Home
    Looks Like Rubbish, Feels Like Home

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find homes for rent.
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.


    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

    eleMMent Palazzo mobile home

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under:

    roof of philadephia home that caught fire in attempt to eliminate bed bugs, shown in screen grab from WTXF-TV

    Bedbugs have been the source of much anxiety and even dispute for landlords, tenants and homeowners alike -- but the source of a fire? Well, that's exactly what happened to a homeowner in Woodbury, N.J., whose home caught fire twice in one day: According to news accounts, the homeowner accidentally set the second floor of his home on fire Thursday while trying to rid the home of the pests.

    The Philadelphia Inquirer quoted a Gloucester County, N.J., spokeswoman as saying that the male owner, who was not named in reports, used a space heater, hair dryer and heat gun in an attempt to rid a second-floor bedroom of the bedbugs. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, high heat may kill bedbugs: But in this case, all it did was start the first fire. That blaze was quickly put out. The cause of the second blaze was unknown but WPVI-TV in Philadelphia reported that it nearly gutted the structure.

    The Associated Press reported that the homeowner was hospitalized with unspecified injuries. CBS Philadelphia also reported that three firefighters were injured while fighting the fires at the home.

    Bedbugs Do's and Don'ts: Though high heat can kill bedbugs, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, raising indoor temperatures with heat-emitting devices like space heaters simply "won't do the job." Special equipment that sustains very high temperatures are required for the successful eradication of bedbugs.

    Woodbury Fire Marshall Joseph Buono told WPVI-TV that quick "Internet remedies" for killing bedbugs are a "catastrophe in the making." Homeowners should instead call a professional bedbug exterminator. The EPA adds that homeowners should avoid discarding bedbug-ridden mattresses or furniture to avoid spreading the infestation. Instead, have them professionally fumigated.


    More about bedbugs:
    Tenant Faika Shaaban Awarded $800,000 for Bedbug Infestation
    Did Norah Jones Bring Bedbugs Home?
    Bedbug Killers Brainstorm at Chicago Conference

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to
    calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.
    Find homes for rent in your area.

    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under: ,,

    After a long and arduous apartment search in Brooklyn, Megan Isenstadt and Benjamin Sirota finally found the place of their dreams. The apartment in a cute brownstone building came with its own issues -- but so do most places in New York City. Sometimes their windows wouldn't shut all the way and wood slats in the floor would have to be nailed back down. But they loved their new home and the other tenants in the building. But their dream apartment soon became a nightmare -- and so did the building management.

    When the boiler broke in the basement of the building, Isenstadt and Sirota's living situation quickly deteriorated. They soon realized that one thing to watch out for when searching for a new apartment is how responsive the landlord will be to tenants' issues. When their landlord wasn't responsive at all to the broken boiler, they found themselves living in an apartment where their lives were possibly in danger. See their story in the video above.

    See more on dealing with landlords:
    When You Can Force Your Landlord To Listen To You
    Tenants: Keep Your Landlord in Check
    Tenants' Rights When Landlord Breaks Rental Agreement

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find homes for rent.
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.


    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

    stairs to basement of Isenstadt and Sirota's apartment building

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under:

    Meagan Schmidt stands behind Journey Church sign in front yard

    We've tried to warn you time and time again: Just because you're the homeowner doesn't mean you can do whatever you want with your house. When you live under the bylaws of a homeowners association, you have to follow their rules as to what you can display on the exterior of your home and in your yard. That sometimes means no angel statues, no American flags (even if you're a vet) and a host of other inconveniences. For one woman, it means that she can't make a public show of support for the church that changed her life.

    Meagan Schmidt of Katy, Texas, has a sign advertising The Journey Church in her front yard. "It's an awesome church," Schmidt told Houston TV station Fox 26. "I love what they do for the community." But the Highland Creek Village Homeowners Association has said that the sign violates a bylaw prohibiting commercial signage in yards. Schmidt says that bylaw violates her right to free speech and religious expression.

    She told Fox 26 that she went to an HOA meeting to discuss the sign, but the organization's leaders were argumentative. They have told her to communicate through the HOA's attorneys and have threatened to take her to court to have the sign removed, Schmidt said. She said that she's going to fight back, and she isn't taking down the sign in her yard. Schmidt rents the home that she lives in, but her home's owner, who was not identified in the Fox 26 report, says that he supports Schmidt's right to keep the sign in the yard. The homeowner reportedly has even paid fines levied by the HOA over the sign.

    Highland Creek Village Homeowners Association said in a statement to Fox 26 -- which the station posted on its Facebook page -- that it has a history of trouble with the homeowner renting to Schmidt. "Highland Creek Village goes to great lengths to work with owners to avoid problems," the statement reads. "However, the owner of this property has been charged with failure to cut the grass, and posting a commercial sign. The homeowner, unfortunately, was charged for cutting the grass on one occasion as the tenants flat out stated to the Association that the deed restrictions do not apply to them."

    See the whole story on Fox 26 Houston 26.

    HOAs do sometimes have complete say over what kinds of signs, if any, you can put in your yard without fear of breaking any laws. When it comes to political signs, for example, HOAs can ban any and all displays if there are no state and local laws that say otherwise -- and they can do so without fear of violating the First Amendment.

    See more about HOA disputes:
    Playboy Bunny Holly Madison: Hounding by HOA Forcing Me to Move
    Halloween Light Show Banned by HOA
    HOA Tells Residents Yard Statues Aren't Allowed

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to
    calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.
    Find homes for rent in your area.

    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under: ,


    Des Moines Makes Best Cities List For Young, Broke, Single



    Young, broke and single? There's a city that's perfect for you, and you probably wouldn't guess it: Des Moines, Iowa. You might think that sounds boring, but locals say it's totally not.

    Des Moines was listed in a new national survey among the 20 best cities for people who are young, broke and single. The survey was conducted by an advice website, MoneyUnder30. "There's all kinds of stuff going on here that didn't happen when I was a kid, which is awesome," resident Afton Crabtree told local TV station KCCI. Crabtree, who grew up in Des Moines, left for Denver years ago but returned to her hometown after finding that things were "a little expensive" in Denver.

    "Cheap food, cheap beer and cheap thrills" were among the criteria for Money Under 30's list, which also included employment opportunities, the cost of living, and the number of single people ages 18 to 44. Des Moines ranked No. 8 on the list; Austin, Texas, came out on top. But Des Moines may be the city that sticks out the most.

    "It was a boring city," Pete Jones, who founded the website DesMoinesIsNotBoring, told KCCI. "I lived here a long time and experienced it and really started turning the curve. Good jobs, good nightlife, good food." Watch the video above to see why locals say Des Moines is a great spot for the young, broke and single.

    See more news about living single in a city:
    Where Micro-Apartments Loom as Next Big Thing in Renting
    Top 10 U.S. Rental Markets
    City Sees a Backlash Against Tiny Apartments

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find homes for rent.
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.


    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

    downtown Des Moines Iowa

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under:




    If you're looking for a new apartment, be on alert for scammers trying to do more than pass broom closets for fully furnished one-bedrooms.

    This other class of scam artists hooks renters by copying and reposting legitimate listings on sites like Craigslist, reports the Fox 40 TV station in Sacramento, Calif. These scammers try to persuade apartment hunters to send them money before a deal is confirmed, and often claim that they can't meet because they are out of town. Fox 40 reporter Dennis Shanahan located and responded to a forged listing and was told that he could be shipped the keys via FedEx without an initial meeting.

    Even the most seasoned apartment hunters might not notice anything amiss because the listings look identical to real ones. Some con artists have even taken it a step further, reportedly breaking into homes before taking unsuspecting renters on a tour, presumably to prove their legitimacy. For more on how to spot and avoid these traps, view Fox 40's video above.

    See more about renting:
    Online Rental Scams to Avoid
    Renters Beware: Fraudsters Still Lurking on Craigslist
    Urban Compass Wants to Steer the Rental Industry in New Direction

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find homes for rent.
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.


    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under:




    Much like roofing projects, plumbing is generally a task that's better left to the professionals. But if you're determined to flex your DIY muscles on those pipes and tubes (and save some money while you're at it), we have some useful tips for fixing some common, minor problems without having to call a plumber.

    Fixing a running toilet: This is a surprisingly straightforward homeowner fix that doesn't usually require a professional plumber, even if you don't have any plumbing experience, according to Family Handy Man. The main cause of a running toilet is a leaky flapper valve. A fast remedy is to simply install a new flapper (widely available at hardware stores for under $10), ensuring that it creates a watertight seal with the flush valve. TLC offers a step-by-step guide on how to fix a leaky toilet flapper.

    Flapper seem to work OK? It could also be your toilet's ballcock or refill tube. This Old House takes you through the fixes in each scenario.

    Snaking a drain: Tired of calling a plumber to snake your clogged main drainpipe? Snaking a drain is a pretty painless task, particularly if you have the right tools on hand. DIY Network recommends getting a jetting machine, which will break through clogs in the pipe. Jetting or drain cleaning machines can be purchased online. Once you've removed the cover from the cleanout on the main drain, it's just a matter of securing the hose and turning on the machine. DIY Network offers a step-by-step guide on how to snake the main drain.

    For less severe clogs in say, bathroom drainpipes, a sewer snake and a plunger are effective options. Family Handy Man offers a step-by-step guide on how to fix minor drain clogs.

    Fixing a leaky kitchen faucet. According to This Old House, a homeowner with a little wherewithal and a good wrench should be able to fix a leaky single-handed faucet in half an hour. It's just a matter of disassembling the cartridge faucet to assess the cause of the leak -- in many cases, a defective O-ring -- and replacing the old parts. This Old House has a step-by-step guide on how to fix a drippy kitchen faucet.

    Don't have a cartridge faucet? Family Handy Man also offers DIY guides on how to fix rotary ball and ceramic disc faucets.



    More about DIY projects for the home:
    Want a Patio? Try Stamped Concrete as a Low-Cost Alternative
    Use a Salvaged Tub to Turn Your Backyard Into a Soothing Oasis
    DIY Kitchen Remodels for Investment Properties

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.

    Find homes for rent.

    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under: ,,

    Getty Images

    The dramatic rise in interest rates that has occurred over the past two months has had a big impact on the mortgage-loan market. Rates on standard 30-year mortgages have gone from below 3.5 percent as recently as late April to well above 4.5 percent currently, according to Bankrate, significantly increasing the monthly payments that new homebuyers will pay and making it harder to qualify for mortgage loans.

    But there's one type of mortgage loan that hasn't seen interest rates budge: adjustable-rate mortgages. They're risky, and some blame them for the last housing bubble, but you can expect to see a big rise in the use of ARMs -- at what could be the worst possible time.

    The Risks and Rewards of Adjustable-Rate Mortgages

    Until recently, it didn't make sense for most would-be borrowers to look seriously at ARMs. With fixed-rate mortgages available at interest rates near or in some cases below those offered for ARMs, there was no substantial reward to make up for taking on the risk of frequent changes in the interest rate you'd pay on your loan.

    Now, though, ARMs are the only way you can get a mortgage with a rate below 3 percent, and that's almost certain to make homebuyers who've missed out on low fixed-rate mortgages take a second look at adjustable-rate mortgages. Indeed, even as other mortgage rates have soared, ARM rates as reported by Bankrate have held steady between 2.7 percent and 3.1 percent. As Freddie Mac Vice President and Chief Economist Frank Nothaft observed recently, "with the ongoing run up in fixed mortgage rates, adjustable-rate mortgages are becoming more popular among homeowners looking to refinance and for home purchasers." Last week, the Mortgage Bankers Association said that the share of adjustable-rate mortgage activity rose to its highest level since July 2008.

    Sponsored Links
    The benefits of an adjustable-rate mortgage when fixed rates are relatively high are easy to see. With payments that are amortized over the same period as a 30-year fixed mortgage, monthly payments on ARMs can be much lower when there's a big gap in rates between fixed and adjustable mortgages. For instance, at 3 percent, your monthly payment on a $200,000 home would be $843. At 4 percent, the payment would be $955. Put another way, if your income only qualified you for a monthly payment of $843, then paying a higher rate would only allow you to take out a loan for $177,000. So having access to lower-rate ARMs will let you spend more on the house you want, which is useful especially in light of the increases in home prices over the past year.

    The problem with ARMs, though, is that the interest rate is subject to change throughout the life of the loan. For the lowest-rate ARMs available, that initial low rate is locked in for only one year, with subsequent resets on an annual basis. If short-term interest rates start to follow longer-term rates higher, then your monthly payment will skyrocket. Other types of ARMs allow you to lock in the initial rate for a longer period of time, but they start with higher interest rates, too.

    Be Careful With ARMs

    Before you consider an adjustable-rate mortgage, you need to understand exactly what its terms mean and what effect they could have on your payments in the future. Look closely at provisions governing maximum rate increases both annually and over the life of your loan, and run the numbers to see how much your monthly payment would rise under a broad set of realistic scenarios. The short-term interest rates on which ARMs are based are still near record lows despite the run-up in other mortgage rates, but economists believe that eventually, those short-term rates will follow suit. If you don't want to make the same mistake that resulted in many borrowers losing their homes to foreclosure during the housing bust, then taking out an adjustable-rate mortgage without having the capacity to make payments in a more normal interest rate environment is a bad idea.

    You can follow Motley Fool contributor Dan Caplinger on Twitter @DanCaplinger or on Google+.

    %Gallery-187047%

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0
  • 07/20/13--20:58: Home Inspection Horrors
  • Filed under: ,,

    home inspection found this tangled cable tv box

    Home inspection is serious business. But home inspectors have a wicked sense of humor. If you need proof, just check out this batch of "Postcards From the Field," the perennially popular feature of the American Society of Home Inspectors. From a wasp's nest the size of a basketball to a DIY electrical job that's truly shocking, home inspectors have seen it all -- and lucky for us, they carry cameras.

    Photos courtesy of the ASHI Reporter.

    HOME INSPECTION SHOCKERS:
    %Gallery-193736%
    More on home inspections:
    Home Inspection Red Flags
    10 Common Home Inspection Issues
    The Scary Things Home Inspections Turn Up

    Home Inspections for Home Buyers

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0
  • 07/20/13--20:58: 8 Home Inspection Red Flags
  • Filed under: ,,

    Wayne Bonnell, 67, is cleaning out house of Helen Hutchinson, 73, roof gutters at Littleton, Colo., on Thursday, June 7, 2012. A new nonprofit called Village to Village network has sprung up to help older adults age in place. There are two Village nonprofits in the Denver Metro -- one in Wash Park called Washington Park Cares, and one in Jeffco, the Columbine Community Village. Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post
    Getty Images
    Our gallery of home inspection nightmares (below) is good for a laugh, but a home inspection is serious business. It's the buyer's opportunity to make sure that the house they're about to purchase doesn't hold any expensive surprises.

    A typical home inspection includes a check of a house's structural and mechanical condition, from the roof to the foundation, as well as tests for the presence of radon gas and the detection of wood-destroying insects. Depending on the seriousness of what the inspection uncovers, the buyer can walk away from the deal (most contracts include an inspection contingency in the event of major flaws) or negotiate with the seller for the necessary repairs.

    These are the red flags that should send a buyer back to the negotiating table, according to home improvement expert Tom Kraeutler of The Money Pit.

    1. Termites and other live-in pests: The home you've fallen in love with may also be adored by the local termite population. The sooner termites are detected, the better. The same goes for other wood-devouring pests like powder-post beetles. Keep in mind that getting rid of the intruders is just the first step. Once the problem has been addressed, have a pest control expert advise you on what needs to be done in order to prevent their return.

    2. Drainage issues: Poor drainage can lead to wood rot, wet basements, perennially wet crawlspaces and major mold growth. Problems are usually caused by missing or damaged gutters and downspouts, or improper grading at ground level. Correcting grading and replacing gutters is a lot less costly than undoing damage caused by the accumulation of moisture.

    3. Pervasive mold: Where moisture collects, so grows mold, a threat to human health as well as to a home's structure. Improper ventilation can be the culprit in smaller, more contained spaces, such as bathrooms. But think twice about buying a property where mold is pervasive -- that's a sign of long-term moisture issues.

    4. Faulty foundation: A cracked or crumbling foundation calls for attention and repair, with costs ranging from moderate to astronomically expensive. The topper of foundation expenses is the foundation that needs to be replaced altogether -- a possibility if you insist on shopping "historic" properties. Be aware that their beautiful details and old-fashioned charms may come with epic underlying expenses.

    6. Worn-out roofing: Enter any sale agreement with an awareness of your own cost tolerance for roof repair versus replacement. The age and type of roofing material will figure into your home inspector's findings, as well as the price tag of repair or replacement. An older home still sheltered by asbestos roofing material, for example, requires costly disposal processes to prevent release of and exposure to its dangerous contents.

    7. Toxic materials: Asbestos may be elsewhere in a home's finishes, calling for your consideration of containment and replacement costs. Other expensive finish issues include lead paint and, more recently, Chinese drywall, which found its way into homes built during the boom years of 2004 and 2005. This product's sulfur off-gassing leads to illness as well as damage to home systems, so you'll need to have it completely removed and replaced if it's found in the home that you're hoping to buy.

    8. Outdated wiring: Home inspectors will typically open and inspect the main electrical panel, looking for overloaded circuits, proper grounding and the presence of any trouble spots like aluminum branch circuit wiring, a serious fire hazard.

    HOME INSPECTION HORRORS:
    %Gallery-193736%
    More on home inspections:
    Home Inspections: It Pays to Know What You're Buying
    The Scary Things Home Inspections Turn Up
    Guide to Settlement and Escrow

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find homes for sale in your area.
    Find foreclosures in your area.
    Get property tax help from our experts.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under: ,



    It's not uncommon for parents to support their kids' athletic pursuits with more than a back-of-the-garage basketball hoop, as some go so far as to install swimming pools, backyard skating rinks, pitching mounds, putting greens and even indoor courts. But one Minnesota man put a home-made batting cage in his yard that the whole neighborhood could use -- then bought a house next door so that he could expand the facility.

    "I've had a lot of crazy ideas; this one worked out well," Rick DesLauriers told Twin Cities TV station KARE, in its report (see the video below) on how the Minnetonka homeowner started with a few abandoned telephone poles, remodeled his own property, then built next door. DesLauriers has since seen his son, Mike, end up playing college ball, where he set the state record for hits in a high school career and shares a record for hits in a season. But the payoff of DesLauriers' investment and labor didn't stop there. Along with earning spots on tournament teams, the ball-playing of three other neighborhood youths who grew up practicing at the batting cage has earned them athletic scholarships, the TV station says, and a fourth is in the Minnesota Twins minor league system.

    "It can't be a coincidence, can it?" said the father of Minnetonka High School's baseball MVP in the KARE report. "It's not all the same genetic pool. We're not related."



    More about unusual DIY projects:
    WATCH: How Indiana Man's Roller Coaster Project Grew
    Building 'God's Treehouse'
    Digging a Memorial to Mining

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.

    Find homes for rent.

    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under: ,



    Text by Homesessive.com

    When it comes to home maintenance and repairs, many homeowners opt for the DIY approach. Not only is it a fun way to get your hands dirty, but it can save money on the expenses of hiring a professional. However, many home DIY-ers neglect to fully prepare themselves for accomplishing the task at hand. This results in surprisingly common mistakes that could easily be avoided. So before you choose to DIY something in your own home, take a look at our list of common mistakes homeowners make and learn what you can do to prevent them from happening to you!

    Electrical Repair

    When it comes to DIY around the house, there's one area that should more often than not be left to the professionals-electrical repairs. According to Root Electric, anywhere from 4000-6000 people are injured each year from electric accidents with a high percentage coming from those performing DIY electric repair attempts.

    DIYer falls from a roofNeglecting Safety Tips

    A great deal of at home DIYers neglect useful and common safety tips during projects. For instance, wearing protective eye wear and dust masks are crucial to a person's safety while doing household repairs. Additionally, it's important to be extra careful and watchful no matter the size of the project you are doing.

    Not Taking Out Required Permits

    Another common mistake homeowners make when DIYing themselves is neglecting to take out the required permits. Not only is this not meeting legal standards, but not following certain procedures can be unsafe.

    Starting a Job Unprepared

    It's great to want to tackle a household task without calling in the professionals, but make sure you are fully prepared. A common mistake most homeowners make is not checking they have the necessary materials. Before you get in over your head on a project, double check your supply list.

    Read the full list of tips on Homesessive.com.

    See more on DIY remodeling:
    5 Renovations That Could Hurt Your Home's Resale
    Makeovers That Add Value to Your Home
    Remodeling? Avoid These Costly Mistakes

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find homes for rent.
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.


    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under: ,




    Elvis Presley's Palm Springs getaway may finally open to the public in a way the King of Rock 'n' Roll would have been satisfied with, with tours promised for this fall. Ownership of the home that Elvis and Priscilla Presley bought in 1970 -- and which the singer owned until his death in 1977 -- has been given to one of the investors in the desert property after a months-long court battle.

    Reno Fontana and his wife bought the house in 2003 with the help of backers, but Fontana went into bankruptcy several times and was evicted in January, reports Palm Springs TV station KMIR. As described in the video above, a judge decided last week that the place dubbed "Graceland West" belongs to investor Randy Raicevic, who told KMIR that he plans to repair and revamp the tourist landmark so that it looks the way it did in Presley's day. Raicevic told Palm Springs' Desert Sun newspaper said that it will then be open daily for tours, at $20 per person, with a target date of Oct. 1.

    The way the home's presence impacts the neighborhood might be different, too. Fontana purportedly irritated neighbors with the large parties and busloads of tourists that he hosted at the house. Raicevic told The Sun that visitors will be kept to a minimum, though, and "We'll not keep busy streets."



    Previous stories on Presley homes:
    Elvis Presley's Home a Teardown?
    Elvis' 'Graceland' Deal: $1,000 Down
    L
    isa Marie Presley's Home


    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to
    calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.
    See celebrity real estate.

    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under: ,




    A family of four left homeless by the destruction of their house in Hurricane Sandy thought they had found salvation in a FEMA-funded apartment that they began renting in March. But the Norinder family's troubles have only continued, says Lauren Norinder. She and her husband Jonas believe that their 4-year-old son's health has been threatened by conditions at the two-bedroom unit that they rented in the community of West Babylon, Norinder told New York's WPIX-TV.

    Hurricane Sandy "totaled" their house on Oct. 29, 2012, Lauren Norinder says, and it must be leveled, so moving from a hotel to the Harbour Club in Long Island's West Babylon community -- where FEMA would be paying the $2,000-a-month rent -- seemed ideal. But the discovery of black mold at their apartment soon changed all that, and along with the health issue, many of the possessions the family was able to salvage from Hurricane Sandy now have been ruined by the mold at the Harbour Club, Norinder charges. But as seen in the video above, so far the family has met stiff resistance in getting out of their lease and recovering a$4,000 security deposit, with the property's management countering the Norinders' complaint by saying that the family actually brought the problem on themselves.

    See more about the impact of Hurricane Sandy:
    Flood Insurance Rates Leave Sandy Victims With Sticker Shock
    Homebuyers Searching for Deals in Hurricane Sandy Wreckage
    Hurricane Sandy and 2012's Other Natural Disasters Could Cost Homeowners for Years to Come

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to
    calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find homes for rent
    in your area.
    See celebrity real estate.

    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under:




    He was a college senior when he started saving for a down payment on a house. Just this fact alone makes Michael Luangrath an anomaly among millennials, but he wasn't doing it for himself. The house was going to be a gift for his mother, Daovanh, a cancer survivor.

    Mounting hospital bills had forced Daovanh Luangrath -- a shop owner who pulled 13-hour shifts throughout her son's life -- to downsize their Las Vegas home after her son left for college. When Michael Luangrath (pictured at left) arrived at their new home for the first time, he said his heart sank. "Everything my mom worked for -- all that work -- just came tumbling down," he said. That's when he decided that he would buy her a house.

    Six year later, and just in time for Mother's Day, Michael was able to deliver on his secret promise.

    For the full story, watch the video above.

    More on homebuying:
    Today's Housing Market Making It Extra Tough on First-Time Homebuyers
    Shut Out By a Seller's Market? A Letter Goes a Long Way
    Don't Let Student Debt Keep You From Graduating Into a House

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find homes for rent.
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.


    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0




    A couple's move across country left them without their furniture and other possessions for several weeks when, they say, the moving company they hired decided to hold their belongings "hostage." For their move from Florida to Colorado, Ashley Kenner and Mike Gorokhovksy hired First Call Movers for about $1,800 to transport their items -- expecting delivery in 14 to 21 business days. After that time passed and Kenner began calling First Call daily for updates, she says that she began to get varying explanations for the delay.

    Now, NBC's "Today" show reports, First Call Movers is under federal scrutiny as part of an investigation into the growing problem of fraud by "rogue" interstate movers -- having drawn dozens of complaints. Meanwhile, First Call suggests that the couple had wanted their belongings placed in storage.

    See NBC's investigation of the couple's situation in the video above, and steps to take to avoid being defrauded by an unscrupulous moving company.

    More advice about moving:
    Long-Distance Moves Can Be a Long Haul for Your Sanity
    10 Ways to Save on Moving Costs
    Avoiding Moving-Day Disaster

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find homes for rent.
    Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find
    foreclosures in your area.


    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under: ,




    Along with all the homes it destroyed and the people it made homeless, another thing that Hurricane Sandy left behind was black mold. A family on New York's Long Island may now have fallen victim to all three. The Norinder family saw their house wrecked beyond repair when the storm struck in October 2012, and after months of living in a hotel were finally able to find an apartment. But as WPIX-TV reported in a segment featured on AOL Real Estate, that apartment might be aggravating young Lucas Norinder's bronchial asthma because of a mold problem there -- even though the apartment's management insists that there was no problem there before the family of four moved in, and that the complex wasn't flooded by Sandy.

    In the video above, the New York TV station follows up its investigation of the Norinders' situation with a look at lab tests that show the family has a right to be concerned. It also addresses questions raised about whether the family is responsible for creating the problem and whether it might have brought the mold (pictured at left) with them when they moved in with possessions salvaged from their hurricane-damaged house. Apartment management, meanwhile, suggests that the media should instead be taking a closer look at the behavior of the Norinders.

    More about toxic mold:
    Who's Responsible for Mold in Your Apartment
    Allergy-Proofing Your Home, Room by Room
    How to Keep Toxic Mold Out of Your House

    More on AOL Real Estate:
    Find out how to
    calculate mortgage payments.
    Find
    homes for sale in your area.
    Find homes for rent
    in your area.
    See celebrity real estate.

    Follow us on Twitter at @AOLRealEstate or connect with AOL Real Estate on Facebook.

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


    0 0

    Filed under:


    It may not be a new trick, but it's apparently still managing to snare many unsuspecting renters. Police in New Orleans are searching for a man whom they say pretended to be a real estate agent on Craigslist so that he could trick renters into paying him deposits a home that was actually for sale. As seen in the video above, the scam snared at least four people who responded to the Craigslist ad, police say, with one woman paying the man a $1,000 security deposit.

    The alleged conman purportedly used the name of an employee at a legitimate real estate company, and was able to show the home to renters by entering through a window and then leaving the home unlocked. The property's actual listing agent told New Orleans TV station WDSU that homes he's represented have been targeted before. "I've had several of my properties that are for sale, and some kind of way, they get the information off the Realtor's websites and put them on Craigslist like they own the house," Jerome Winder said.

    Just last month, AOL Real Estate carried the story of another alleged scam that victimized a family in St. Louis for months, as they unsuspectingly rented a home that was in the process of foreclosure. In that case, police say, the scammers went so far as to change the locks on the home and forged ownership papers. Winder told WDSU that renters should ask extra questions when renting from a site like Craigslist, including contacting the real estate agency listed to confirm that the property is for rent.

    AOL Real Estate's guide on avoiding Craigslist rental scams, also warns of:
    1. A deal that sounds too good to be true. It probably isn't, so compare listings to gain insight into the market rate.
    2. The bait-and-switch. Finding out that an apartment you were interested in has, when you arrive to see it, already been rented but another is available at a higher price.
    3. Requests for deposit funds to be wired. Don't send checks or money wires to people you don't know.



    More on rental scams:
    Scammers With Very Believable Listings
    Fraudsters Still Lurking on Craigslist
    Scammers Coming After Renters' Money

     

    Permalink | Email this | Comments


older | 1 | .... | 23 | 24 | (Page 25) | 26 | 27 | 28 | newer